kinds of drugs and its side effects

Another contest & a product endorsement

I got an email yesterday from a woman named Annie, the web director at Mambo Sprouts, a site that helps promote natural and organic manufacturers. She asked for my help in publicizing a photo contest on my blog. It’s co-sponsored by Wellness Natural Food for Pets and benefits an animal charity. I said yes, so here’s the link.

The reason that I agreed is two-fold: It’s for a good cause. And it was clear that Annie had bothered to look at my blog.

I get a lot of solicitations, most of them from people who have not taken the time to find out what subjects I cover and what my views are. I’m thinking specifically of  one person who has asked me twice to link to a site that sells electric fences for dogs. Anyone who’s spent five minutes on my blog could figure out that I’m opposed to shock collars, electric fences, and all other negative methods of behavior modification.

Annie also asked me if I was interested in doing a product review of any Wellness pet foods. I am generally unable to test anything edible on Frankie, since he is diabetic, but as it happens his diet consists of Wellness Core kibble — high fiber, low fat, grain free — topped with lean meat. I did a lot of research and discovered that the company does not use gross ingredients. Frankie likes the kibble and seems to thrive on it.  So my endorsement of Wellness products — or at least one of them — is honest and heartfelt.

I love Wellness Core!

I love Wellness Core, too!

But in the spirit of the new FCC blogging rules of full disclosure, I can’t leave it at that. You see, I woke up this morning to discover that the bag of Wellness Core had a small hole in it, made by teeny teeth. If that weren’t enough of a giveaway as to the (generic) identity of the perpetrator, there were mouse turds in the drawer where I keep Frankie’s food. Eeek!

So I feel compelled to add: “Wellness. Mice like it too.”

If you still want want me as a spokesperson, Annie, feel free to send me a few bags of Wellness Core. You get what you pay for, and Wellness products are not inexpensive.

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7 Comments

  1. kimhalligan1
    Posted December 15, 2009 at 7:36 am | Permalink

    Hi Edie and Frankie. I also feed all 6 of my dogs Wellness Core dog food along with other foods, Honest KItchen and Dr. Harveys. They also like Wellness treats.

    • Edie
      Posted December 15, 2009 at 9:04 am | Permalink

      Now there’s an enthusiastic endorsement that doesn’t involve rodents. Thanks, Kim!

  2. Karen
    Posted December 15, 2009 at 3:48 pm | Permalink

    I feed my rescue toy poodle Core Wellness Ocean Fish kibble. Before transitioning his food, he had itching and allergy symptoms — on Core Wellness, no itching, scratching, etc. He hoovers the food down so I know he likes it.

    Seeing how well he’s done on it, I’m definitely a Wellness Core fan 🙂

  3. Clare
    Posted December 15, 2009 at 9:33 pm | Permalink

    Is Wellness Cure available at pet supply stores, or is it a vet-supplied product? My vet doesn’t have it.

    • Edie
      Posted December 16, 2009 at 6:25 am | Permalink

      Ha – Freudian slip? It’s Core, not Cure. And, yes, it’s available at pet supply stores, not at vets. I don’t think you’ll find it at the chains; I get it at the local feed store that sells high-quality pet foods. It’s just occurred to me: You were/are feeding Archie Royal Canin aren’t you? And wasn’t there some kind of recall…?

  4. Kelly
    Posted December 16, 2009 at 6:22 pm | Permalink

    Go on to the Wellnesspetfood.com website and there you can go to the store finder and type in your zip code and locate stores in your area that carry Wellness products.

  5. Rebecca Boren
    Posted December 29, 2009 at 6:00 pm | Permalink

    Edie, I’m surprised that you (not to mention His Frankieness) have lasted this long putting Frankie’s food in a drawer. Tightly-sealed pet food containers are a necessity of life in the desert — although my horrified discovery involved an ant invasion, not rodents. A small-size metal garbage can is a good start — you can get a pet-food-sized one for around $15 at Target or a hardware store. If your invaders are more determined, you may need to move up to the hermetically sealed, custom-designed pet food containers. In a masterpiece of poor marketing, the ones I use don’t have their names anywhere, but I believe they are called Vittle Vaults. A good size — square-ish tub just the right size to hold a 35-ound bag of food, but still easy to shove out of the way. A lid that twists closed with no stress on my arthritis-ridden fingers. And they have successfully fended off the desert insects for a couple of seasons now. Not to mention terriers looking for an unscheduled snack.

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